Books by David

If all organizations are made up of individuals, and if what individuals think and feel about work determines how they show up in those organizations, then we need to explore the concept of ‘work’ as much as ‘leadership’ and ‘change’.

David Firth asks us to challenge the ‘default conversation’ about work as difficult and an imposition on our freedom – and to invite it into our lives as a source of self-expression, contribution, growth and joy.

Here, in reverse chronological order, are David Firth’s five seminal books – the way to see work as a way of being in the world, of befriending our inner enemies and having our work be part of an intentional, created and powerful life.

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Bulk Orders

For bulk orders of David’s books (ie 20 copies plus per book), contact David direct at david@davidfirth.com and hear about special bonuses that apply.

  • How to Make Work Fun! The 20th Anniversary Edition

    Updated from the original and with 50 pages of new material from David Firth adding his latest insights and experience gleaned over the last twenty years helping people find enjoyment, meaning and purpose in their work.

  • CHANGE YOUR WORLD, ONE WORD AT A TIME

    Language is the only tool we have. There are ways of speaking that will produce action and change and there are ways of speaking that don’t. This book explores that distinction.

  • FROM MAKING A LIVING TO CREATING A LIFE

    There is too much dissatisfaction, frustration and stress at work. This book shows people how they can truly enjoy and derive deep satisfaction from their work, whatever it is they happen to do for a living.

  • The Corporate Fool

    A book about the Jester, or Fool, as agent of change. Crazy times like these call for some crazy thinking. In this colorful and vibrant book David Firth and Alan Leigh show how The Corporate Fool can help us create successful, innovative and truly vital organizations.

  • How to Make Work Fun!

    The original edition of the book from 1995. A challenge to some deep-seated status quo thinking that the best we can hope for from our work is to get out of it alive and retired.